One friend commented on my mission to log “All the Coffee in Korea” as trying to count every grain of sand on the beach. Actually, he said this would be harder.

73. The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf (Gwangan, Busan). Started in the United States in the early 1960s, the brand expanded globally starting in the late 1990s when two brothers from Singapore bought the company. It's now in over 20 countries in Asia, including South Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, China and Saudi Arabia, as well as in Germany, Egypt and Colombia. This photo was taken outside their Gwangan location. However, I have visited their location in Seomyeon (Busan's largest, most recognizable downtown), within walking distance to the subway. My experience wasn't great, as the coffee was over 4,000 won (not sure exact price, it's been awhile), and this particular cafe was crammed butts-t-nuts with tables, for maximum occupancy. Congestedly, it was.
73. The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf (Gwangan, Busan). Started in the United States in the early 1960s, the brand expanded globally starting in the late 1990s when two brothers from Singapore bought the company. It’s now in over 20 countries in Asia, including South Korea, Malaysia, Singapore, China and Saudi Arabia, as well as in Germany, Egypt and Colombia. This photo was taken outside their Gwangan location. However, I have visited their location in Seomyeon (Busan’s largest, most recognizable downtown), within walking distance to the subway. My experience wasn’t great, as the coffee was over 4,000 won (not sure exact price, it’s been awhile), and this particular cafe was crammed butts-t-nuts with tables, for maximum occupancy. Congestedly, it was.
74. T&T Party Coffee & Cocktail (Haeundae, Busan). This cafe on wheels is a prime example of coffee's stranglehold on the populace. Located within walking distance of Korea's most famous beach, Haeundae, this truck sells mostly bagged, alcoholic concoctions (drinking in public is legal in South Korea), meant to be enjoyed by tourists moving from bar to bar back to the beach or their hostel. It's the majority of the menu, but there's also coffee. Which, I suppose works. If this thing is in operation at 4 a.m., it might be nice to get a cuppa to perk you up enough to last until the sunrise.
74. T&T Party Coffee & Cocktail (Haeundae, Busan). This cafe on wheels is a prime example of coffee’s stranglehold on the populace. Located within walking distance of Korea’s most famous beach, Haeundae, this truck sells mostly bagged, alcoholic concoctions (drinking in public is legal in South Korea), meant to be enjoyed by tourists moving from bar to bar back to the beach or their hostel. It’s the majority of the menu, but there’s also coffee. Which, I suppose works. If this thing is in operation at 4 a.m., it might be nice to get a cuppa to perk you up enough to last until the sunrise.
75. Cafe Adam's (Centum City, Busan). Who is Adam? Is he a real person? Is this a foreign-owned establishment? Is it owned by a Korean who adopted a western name? I pass this every time I take the intercity bus from Busan back to Gimhae, but happened to walk past it last weekend while Wart and I were taking a very long stroll back to her apartment in Jangsan.
75. Cafe Adam’s (Centum City, Busan). “Slow tables make you sweet.” Who is Adam? Is he a real person? Is this a foreign-owned establishment? Is it owned by a Korean who adopted a western name? I pass this every time I take the intercity bus from Busan back to Gimhae, but happened to walk past it last weekend while Wart and I were taking a very long stroll back to her apartment in Jangsan.
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